“Voice of Cholistan” Krishan Lal Bheel to live in hearts through music

136

By Jehangir Khan Tareen

MULTAN, May 17 (APP):Music gives a soul to the universe, wings to mind, flight to imagination and life to everything — it is the strongest form of magic that once admitted to the soul remains forever.

Pakistan is a land enriched with several types of music which had produced an unending list of singers, lyricists and composers. Folk music is powerful form that soothes our souls.

Tufail Niazi, Alam Lohar, Mai Bhaghi, Abida Perveen, Iqbal Bahu, Reshman, Hamid Ali Bela, Phatanay Khan, Faiz Muhammad Baloch, Atta Ullah Essa Khelvi, Mahjabeen Qazalbash, Khyal Muhammad, Allan Faqir, Arif Lohar, Saien Zahoor, Krishan Lal Bheel,Fiqra Bhagut are giants of folk music and the list goes on.

Voice of Cholistan and Pride of Performance iconic singer, Krishan Lal Bheel, who passed away recently, was one of the leading folk singers of Pakistan. Born in 1965 at Chak no 26 MP at Jamaldin Wali road, Sadiqabad, Krishan Lal was second in siblings and was fond of singing since childhood.

The singer’s elder brother, Sukhdev said: “We belonged to humble parentage. Our father was a religious person. Krishan used to croon while grazing goats in the area in his childhood. He was much inspired by legendary folk singer Mai Bhagi of Thar, Sindh and listened her songs eagerly.”

Jalal Chandio, another folk singer hailing from Sindh was Krishan’s favourite, he said adding that his brother had started singing since1980. He got education of music from Chandio and former MPA Lala Mehr Lal G took him for first recording at Radio Pakistan Bahawalpur and introduced him to Station Director Nasrullah Khan Nasir, he stated.

The folksinger sang over 1,000 songs and received number of awards, Sukhdev said and added that his home was full of awards and appreciation certificates. The legendary artist could sing in eight languages including his maternal language, Marwari,Sindhi, Hindi, Saraiki, Urdu, Punjabi and Thari, he informed.

Marwari is a language spoken by all whether they are the Hindus or the Muslims in Marwar, an area of Rajastan, Sukhdev explained. He said that Bheel performed in Cholistan Thar Jeep rally this year which was his last
performance.

Sukhdev appealed to government to build a boundary wall at the Pattan Minara graveyard in his name where he was laid to rest as it was an ancient cemetery of the Hindu community. Great singer had around 100 students while 16 of them are singing. Dittu Lal G , Jamil Lal Debu Pardesi are some of his students.

Pakistan National Council of Arts (PNCA) Director General, Dr Fouzia Saeed paid rich tribute to Krishan Lal Bheel saying that he was high stature singer who had no complaints with life.

“He was contented and a mystic who brought good name to the country by representing it internationally. I have long association of 30 years with Bheel community. I along with Yasir Nauman and others had initiated a movement to revive” Manganiyar” music which was dying. After reviving it, I converted my attention to Bheel community and wrote a booklet trace its history for information of all specially youth”, she explained.

She told APP that Manganiyar, Kohli, Bheel and Maagwar were indigenous castes of the area adding that they own this region and were locals. “We wrote their history for which Krishan Lal other Ustaad cooperated with us a lot. Lakha g Bheel family was big family of the area. They were story tellers,” DG PNCA said.

He that it was last family of story tellers and after death of Lakha G, his team and kids joined Krishan. She announced to arrange a befitting tribute to iconic folk singer under PNCA wherein singers of Cholistan would be invited. “Krsihan will live in our hearts even after his demise because music never dies,” she remarked.

Former Broadcaster and known educationist, Dr Nasrullah Khan Nasir said that Krishan belonged to a nomad family and he introduced him at Bahawalpur Radio. He used to call him ” Murshid” (Spiritual Guide) and had a great respect for him. The news of his death shocked him a lot, Dr Narsrullah informed.

“He was that much involved in music that he got his songs recorded at radio even on his wedding day. When I came to know about it, I immediately called him for recording for a concert and sent him home to tie the knot.”

For centuries, Cholistan had been possessing unexplored folk heritage which was unexposed because no one bothered to excavate the treasures it has, Dr Khan informed. Harsh weather conditions had great repercussions on the temperament of the area people. They laugh and weep heartily. Cholistanis are the “remnants of ancient civilization of Sindh”, he added.

“Voice of Cholistan” as he is known for, died of kidney complications on May 7 this year in Rahimyar Khan. It is rightly said that music is the universal language of mankind.